MAKING YOUR OWN COLOUR CARDS

DSC02476

When I buy a new colour or, as happened recently, I decided to change to a new brand altogether, I always experiment with the new colours and different colour combinations. This enables me to get to know the specific qualities (and also any limitations) of the new colours.

q. So why do you make your own colour cards ?

a. For several reasons

  1. If you get a colour card from an art shop, the reproduction is limited by the printing process, so is usually inaccurate.
  2. If you print one off the internet, it is usually worse.
  3. The colour represented on the casing of the paint is usually miles off.

So for these reasons I make my own.

You simply make a grid for the number of colours using your normal watercolour paper, in my case 48 colours in the full range of Tintoretto paints and 300gsm Bockingford. Then simply dip a moist brush into the tube (or pan) and paint a block of colour gradually make it weaker and then you can see all the various tones of the colour.

DSC02477

ITS VERY IMPORTANT TO ENSURE YOUR BRUSH IS WASHED OUT THOROUGHLY BETWEEN COLOURS OR THEY WILL BE CONTAMINATED WITH THE LAST ONE.

Ok so now you have your colour card what then ?

Let me give you an example, earlier this year I was teaching in Vassiliki in Greece. In Greece the greens are completely different than in my adopted home in Bulgaria. A couple of my favourite trees there were Cypress trees and those very old Olive Groves.

The Old Olive Grove

Both of which are not found in Bulgaria. So my solution was to combine lots of combinations of some of my blues and yellows, and record the results on offcuts of watercolour paper. It was then very easy to hold the sample up against the subject and pick the combination required.

DSC02479

These were the different green swatches I made

I also used this same method when I was experimenting with colours for the stunning sunsets in Greece, combining reds, oranges and yellows.DSC02475

I use these extensively, and to great effect during my workshops in Greece, Bulgaria and Asia.

Why not try making your own, different sky combinations would be a good one wherever you live in the World. In the UK the skies generally are colder so are usually Ultramarine based, whereas in warmer climates Cobalt or even Cerrulean Blue are more accurate.

HAVE FUN WITH COLOUR !

More tips to come, please feel free to subscribe to my blog or leave any comments.

HAPPY PAINTING !

Martin (aka artstevo)

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s